Glossary

* Chaguan (茶馆): Teahouse
* Cheng feng ao xiang (乘风翱翔): Soar, carried by the wind
* Chengxiang (丞相): Prime minister or the most senior of the ministers
* Chi (尺): A distance about equal to a foot
* Daodejing (道德经): The Book of Dao written by Laozi, the founder of Daoism
* Daren (大人): A title of respect (usually reserved for officials)
* Dianxia (殿下): His/Your royal highness
* Er (儿): Child
* Fashi (法师): Title for Buddhist monks
* Fu​qin (父亲) (or bà​ba 爸爸): Father (2nd term is informal)
* Furen (夫人): Mrs, lady, or married woman (formal)
* Ge or gege (哥哥): Older brother
* Gong​gong (公公): Grandfather
* Guai (枴): A weapon similar to what the Japanese call a “tonfa”; literally can be translated to a “crutch”
* Guanyin (觀音): East Asian bodhisattva of compassion; also known as the Goddess of Mercy
* Jianghu (江湖): Literally “rivers and lakes;” usually used to describe the community of generally nomadic, anti-establishment martial artists of ancient China
* Jianzi (毽子): A dexterity game that involves kicking a shuttlecock from foot to foot
* Jiaozi (饺子): Dumplings
* Jie or jiejie (姐姐): Older sister
* Jingshu (经书): A scripture or manual
* Lao (老): An informal term to address the older person of a specific family name
* Laoban (老板): Owner of a business
* Laoshi (老师): Teacher
* Li (里): A distance of approximately 500 meters.
* Liu sha bao (流沙包): Molten salted egg custard steamed bun
* Mantou (馒头): Steamed bun
* Mei or meimei (妹妹): Younger sister
* Mu​qin (母亲) (or mā​ma 妈妈 ): Mother (2nd term is informal)
* Neigong (內功): Inner power
* Nuomiji (糯米鸡): Northern version of the Cantonese dim sum dish, lo mai gai (a lotus leaf wrap consisting of steamed sticky rice and chicken)
* Nv gui (女鬼): A vengeful female ghost
* Po​po (婆婆): Grandmother
* Qi (气): Vital energy
* Qidan/Khitan (契丹): An ethnic group skilled in falconry and horsemanship. Historically they lived in Mongolia (modern Manchuria).
* Qigong (气功): A healing system of deep breathing exercises and movement that is used to harness one’s qi for health and martial arts
* Qing​gong (轻工): The ability to glide across rooftops, scale trees, etc. but not flying.
* Qingjiangcai (清江菜): Bok choy
* Shagua (傻瓜): Silly person
* Shaoye (少爷): Young master, son of the master
* Sheng li gui lai (胜利归来): Come back victorious
* Shifu (师父): Master
* Shixiong (师兄): Term used by juniors to address a senior male fellow student or apprentice
* Taijijian (太极剑): A kind of traditional Chinese sword-play
* Wenren (文人): Literati, scholars or poets
* Xiansheng (先生): Mister
* Xianzhang (县长): Governor of a county
* Xiao (小): An informal term to address the younger person of a specific family name
* Xiaojie (小姐): Young lady, miss (daxiaojie, erxiaojie, etc. are used when addressing multiple females according to age)
* Xishi (喜事): a happy occasion, e.g. weddings
* Yaoguai (妖怪): a demon or monster
* Yuanzhang (院長): overseer of a facility
* Zhuchi (住持): abbot or head monk of a monastery
* Zhuzi (主子): Master (usually of a house or a place)
* Ziran (然): the state of naturalness achieved after using qigong to harness one’s qi

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